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EU pork producers afraid as China launches anti-dumping investigation into meat exports

The move follows last week’s conclusion of the European Commission’s investigation into imports of Chinese electric vehicles.

LONDON, June 18, 2024 – China has launched an anti-dumping probe into the European Union’s pork exports, which experts fear could impact European food producers.

The move follows last week’s conclusion of the European Commission’s investigation into imports of Chinese electric vehicles.

China’s Ministry of Commerce said it would focus its investigation on EU pork imports in 2023 and last up to a year, though this could be extended to six months.

Reacting to China’s decision, Copa and Cogeca, the organisation for farmers and agri-cooperatives in the EU, has warned that this could have a detrimental impact on producers in Spain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, France and Belgium.

In a statement, Copa and Cogeca states: “Given the recent developments and trade tensions rising between EU-China due to EU’s probe into their electric vehicle production, EU agri-food producers have been growing wary of further escalation, given the positive trade balance the sector enjoys in trade with China.”

“This is not the first time EU’s well-performing agri-food products are caught in the crossfire of disputes concerning other sectors. From the perspective of the pork producers and the agri-food sector that works hard to ensure and maintain market access in China, this is not acceptable.”

“Taking part in this investigation will be a very costly and burdensome process and will most likely lead to loss of market in China. Our pigmeat exports to China have already significantly decreased in the previous years, as they’ve rebuilt the local production following the large African Swine Fever outbreak, but the EU still exports important quantities of byproducts, many of which don’t really find their market in Europe.”

“This investigation will surely be impactful for EU producers, especially those in Spain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, France but also Belgium, which has just recently re-gained market access to China.”

They added that participating in the investigation could also be “very costly and burdensome”.

This latest news comes at a challenging time for the EU, which has recently been hit by farmer protests over its Green Deal, with farmers calling for a relaxation of the rules related to the disbursement of billions of euros in farming subsidies.

China targeted French brandy imports in another trade dispute earlier this year and it is understood the country will announce provisionary punitive tariffs on European brandy in August.

This trade dispute opens up new opportunities for other countries to gain market share as a result of escalating tensions.

Reports are emerging that Argentina, Brazil and US meat producers and suppliers could benefit from China’s decision to carry out an anti-dumping probe into the European Union’s pork exports, which experts fear could impact European food producers.

https://thecooperator.news/pork-business-resumes-in-sheema-and-bushenyi-districts/

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